Frequently Asked Questions

//Frequently Asked Questions

Will my drapes be flame retardant?

Fabrics used in most public spaces (including schools, churches, auditoriums, theaters, and more) is required by law in many provinces and states to be certified as flame retardant, according to standards developed by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). NFPA has various standards depending on how the fabric will be used. In the case of draperies, curtains, and similar hanging textiles, the standard that applies is NFPA 701: Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Flame Propagation of Textiles and Films. This test measures the flammability of a fabric when it is exposed to specific sources of ignition.

NFPA 701 (small scale) testing measures the ignition resistance of a fabric after it is exposed to a flame for 12 seconds. The flame, char length, and flaming residue are recorded. The fabric will pass the test if all samples meet the following criteria:

  • An after flame of less than 2.0 seconds
  • A char length of less than 6.5”
  • The specimen does not continue to flame after reaching the floor of the test chamber

Fabric certified as flame retardant is certified to have been tested and passed the NFPA 701 test.

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Is there a standard size curtain?

A frequently asked question is one like “how much would it cost for a standard elementary school drape?” Unfortunately, there is no such thing as a “standard” drape or stage. Each one is unique as are the applications.

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What type of fabric should I use for stage drapes?

Main proscenium drape and valance drape are manufactured in velour – made of either cotton or polyester material. Velours are available in a number of different weights with several factors determining which weight could be right for your application. These factors include budget, sound absorption and overall appearance. A Quality Stage Drapery associate can help you determine which weight will satisfy the needs of your stage.

Back traveller, wing, and border drapes are often made from a cotton fabric that is available in different weights for the reasons mentioned above.

Cyclorama curtain, if required, is typically made from a seamless muslin fabric.
All fabrics, with exception of some muslins, are flame retardant to meet the NFPA 701 test.

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What kinds of curtains and dividers are fireproof?

All fabrics, with exception of one type of scrim, are flame retardant. All fabrics pass the NFPA 701 test and meet building code.

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How long does it take to manufacture my drapes, dividers, or netting?

This is dependent on fabric and color selection; however, it is typically around 2-4 weeks from receipt of purchase order.

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How long does it take Quality Stage Drapery to install my drapery and dividers?

This is dependent on fabric and color selection; however, it is typically around 3-6 weeks from receipt of purchase order.

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How long does the installation process take?

Installation time is directly related to the size of the project being installed, every job is different.

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Do we have use of our facilities while the installation is in progress?

During the installation process we will require the area, where ever it may be, to be clear to prevent any injuries as well as streamline the installation and have your new product installed in a timely manner.

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What information is needed to get a quote?

If the space you are looking to fill is new construction and there are blueprints and specifications available, then the best way to get started is to fax or email this information in.

If you are looking to renovate or add a stage in an existing space, we will need measurements of the entire space (a plan view sketch of the space is helpful) as well as an idea of what type of layout you are looking for and what you are trying to accomplish with this space.

If you are looking to replace existing drapes, then we will need sizes of the drape (height and width), the fabric, and the color of the drape (often on old drapes there will be a tag with this information, usually on a top corner).

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How do I measure for drapes?

If you are measuring a space that requires drapes as well as the track to run them on, we will need the ceiling to floor or structure to floor height (whatever we may be mounting to) and the total width of the curtain required. If the curtain is to be split in the middle, so that it bi-parts, still measure the entire width and make a note that the curtain is to have a centre split.

If you are measuring existing drapes that need to be replaced, we will need the finished height and width of the drape. When measuring the finished width, measure at the very top of the curtain as there will possibly be fullness which would affect the width measurement if taken from the bottom.

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What does ‘fullness’ mean?

Fullness is the amount of fabric sewn into a drape to create the pleats that are often required. If a curtain is manufactured with 1X fullness then this means the curtain is sewn flat – it has no pleats at the top. If a curtain is manufactured with 1.5X fullness then this means the curtain has 50% extra fabric sewn into it to create pleats at the top; for example, if the curtain is to be 10’ wide when finished then we will take 15’ of fabric and pleat it into 10’. If a curtain is manufactured with 2X fullness then this means the curtain has 100% extra fabric sewn into it to create pleats at the top.

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What type of pleats should I use?

There are a number of different pleating styles and they are determined by the style of curtain and how it is being hung.

Box Pleat is a flat pleat that will occur every 8”-12” (depending on fullness) at the top of your drape. This pleat is used whenever the curtain requires a grommet through the top to hang the drape with. All proscenium, wing, border, and back traveller drapes will use this pleat.

Pinch Pleat is a narrow folded pleat that will occur every 6”-10” at the top of your drape. This pleat is used whenever the curtain requires a hook in the rear of the drape to hang the drape with. This application is used for valance drapes when the track and hardware needs to be hidden for overall appearance.

Flat is simply just a hem at the top of your curtain, if no fullness or pleating is required.

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How do I clean my drapes?

STAGE DRAPES

  • Calgary 16oz. 100% cotton velour FR
  • Cardinal 21oz. 100% cotton velour FR
  • Camrose 25oz. 100% cotton velour FR
  • Provost 12oz. 100% cotton FR
  • Parry Sound 16oz. 100% cotton FR

All of the above fabrics are to be dry cleaned only, ensure research is done to locate a cleaner that is capable of stage drapery of your size as well discuss the possibility of shrinkage. Never get these curtains wet as the flame retardant product will crystallize and permanently turn white.

  • Cambridge 25oz. 100% polyester velour IFR

The above fabric can take a normal wash (wash temperature 85 degrees F, rinse temperature 85 degrees F). Tumble dry, normal cycle (drying temperature 140 to 160 degrees F). Maximum number of washing and drying cycles recommended is 10.

HOSPITAL CURTAIN

  • 100% polyester IFR

The above fabrics are machine washable at temperatures that are not to exceed 160 degrees F, add softener in last rinse cycle. A synthetic detergent is to be used (no bleach or caustic soap). Tumble dry for 3-5 minutes on a synthetic cycle 110 degrees F, remove curtains immediately from dryer while still damp as excessive heat will limit permanent press characteristics. Do not put through mangler.

DISCLAIMER – above recommendations are strictly for your information. Quality Stage Drapery Inc. cannot and will not be held responsible for any cleaning or washing operations performed beyond its control.

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How do I care for my drapes?

STAGE DRAPERY
Periodic cleaning is recommended for all curtains, approximately every five years.
Curtains may be brushed, vacuumed or lightly beaten to remove surface dust.
Regularly inspect the curtains for small rips, splitting of the seams, or abrasion to the bottom hem and chain pocket. Inspect the headings for loose grommets or stitching, have them repaired immediately.

HOSPITAL CURTAINS
Stack your curtains when not in use. Keeping curtains out of the way can save them from wear and tear, and will add to the life of the curtain.
Regularly inspect the curtains for small rips, splitting of the seams, or abrasion to the bottom hem and chain pocket. Inspect the headings for loose grommets or stitching, have them repaired immediately.

 

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